silentcuriosity:

Colonel  Robert Gould Shaw-He is the principal subject of the 1989 film Glory, where he is portrayed by Matthew Broderick. 26 year-old Robert Gould Shaw. He led the all black 54th, Massachusetts whose contingent of troops included two of Frederick Douglass’ sons through training as well into battle in South Carolina.

silentcuriosity:

Colonel  Robert Gould Shaw-He is the principal subject of the 1989 film Glory, where he is portrayed by Matthew Broderick. 26 year-old Robert Gould Shaw. He led the all black 54th, Massachusetts whose contingent of troops included two of Frederick Douglass’ sons through training as well into battle in South Carolina.

(via americanisms-deactivated2012121)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 23, 1885:  18th President Ulysses S. Grant Succumbs to Throat Cancer
On this day in 1885, Civil War hero and former President Ulysses S. Grant died in Mount McGregor, New York at the age of 63.  As commanding General of the United States Army, Grant led the Union to victory over the Confederate military, effectively ending the Civil War.  As president, he enforced civil rights laws and fought Ku Klux Klan violence.
Follow Ulysses S. Grant’s life in the public limelight through the political cartoons created about him in the media from his battlefield successes in 1862 to his death in 1885, courtesy of American Experience.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 23, 1885:  18th President Ulysses S. Grant Succumbs to Throat Cancer

On this day in 1885, Civil War hero and former President Ulysses S. Grant died in Mount McGregor, New York at the age of 63.  As commanding General of the United States Army, Grant led the Union to victory over the Confederate military, effectively ending the Civil War.  As president, he enforced civil rights laws and fought Ku Klux Klan violence.

Follow Ulysses S. Grant’s life in the public limelight through the political cartoons created about him in the media from his battlefield successes in 1862 to his death in 1885, courtesy of American Experience.

operationkino:

Two Union veterans of the American Civil War at the Gettysburg Reunion, 1913

operationkino:

Two Union veterans of the American Civil War at the Gettysburg Reunion, 1913

(Source: drmanhattan)

thebluerogue:

Career Service:
John Clem was only 10 years old when he ran away to win the Civil War. (“It was necessary that the Union should be preserved,” he later wrote, “and my help was obviously needed.”) Rejected by Michigan’s 22nd infantry regiment, he tagged along anyway as a drummer boy and rode into Chickamauga seated on a caisson and carrying a musket sawed off to match his size. When a Confederate colonel rode up and yelled “Surrender, you damned little Yankee!” Clem shot him, winning instant fame as “the drummer boy of Chickamauga.”
He went on to fight at Perrysville, Murfreesboro, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, and Atlanta. After the war Ulysses Grant, now president, appointed him second lieutenant; when he retired as a brigadier general in 1915 he was the only Civil War veteran still on duty. “There is no more popular officer in the army,” wrote the New York Times. “Colonel Clem is the son-in-law of a Confederate veteran, and this fact he often cites in conversation with friends as proof of the fact that he is the most ‘united American’ extant.” He died in San Antonio in 1937.

Come see his grave in Arlington Cemetery, just outside of Arlington House!

thebluerogue:

Career Service:

John Clem was only 10 years old when he ran away to win the Civil War. (“It was necessary that the Union should be preserved,” he later wrote, “and my help was obviously needed.”) Rejected by Michigan’s 22nd infantry regiment, he tagged along anyway as a drummer boy and rode into Chickamauga seated on a caisson and carrying a musket sawed off to match his size. When a Confederate colonel rode up and yelled “Surrender, you damned little Yankee!” Clem shot him, winning instant fame as “the drummer boy of Chickamauga.”

He went on to fight at Perrysville, Murfreesboro, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, and Atlanta. After the war Ulysses Grant, now president, appointed him second lieutenant; when he retired as a brigadier general in 1915 he was the only Civil War veteran still on duty. “There is no more popular officer in the army,” wrote the New York Times. “Colonel Clem is the son-in-law of a Confederate veteran, and this fact he often cites in conversation with friends as proof of the fact that he is the most ‘united American’ extant.” He died in San Antonio in 1937.

Come see his grave in Arlington Cemetery, just outside of Arlington House!

(Source: thecoldwaters)

thecommongrave:

Confederate Veterans at the Gamble Plantation in Ellenton, FL for Judah P. Benjamin Memorial.
Benjamin was the First Attorney General of the Confederacy and 2nd Secretary of War. He lived in Florida for a time after the he fled Virginia when Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia.

thecommongrave:

Confederate Veterans at the Gamble Plantation in Ellenton, FL for Judah P. Benjamin Memorial.

Benjamin was the First Attorney General of the Confederacy and 2nd Secretary of War. He lived in Florida for a time after the he fled Virginia when Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia.

encyclopediavirginia:

From Kevin Levin’s Remembering the Battle of the Crater: War as Murder (2012):

Three years later [in 1869], John Elder—who was present in Petersburg at the time of the battle working as an aide in the field and as a mapmaker—released his dramatic oil painting of the battle, which highlighted the importance of [William] Mahone’s counterattack. Elder depicted the fighting at close range in all of its gruesome detail, but the observer’s eye is drawn to the advancing tide of Mahone’s men in the Twelfth Virginia Infantry, who are poised to sweep the area and put an end to any planned Union advance. One art critic left a colorful review: “The suspense in this portion of the scene is fearful; and one dreads that the reinforcements will arrive to[o] late. But they are hurrying on. With their wild, impulsive yell, so characteristic of the Southern army, regardless of rank or line, in double column, Mahone’s brigade comes pouring in.” The success of Elder’s painting helped to shape the popular belief that Confederate victory could be understood by focusing on the contributions of Virginians.

A review of the book’s introduction and first chapter can be read here.
IMAGE: Postcard from 1930 based on the Elder painting

encyclopediavirginia:

From Kevin Levin’s Remembering the Battle of the Crater: War as Murder (2012):

Three years later [in 1869], John Elder—who was present in Petersburg at the time of the battle working as an aide in the field and as a mapmaker—released his dramatic oil painting of the battle, which highlighted the importance of [William] Mahone’s counterattack. Elder depicted the fighting at close range in all of its gruesome detail, but the observer’s eye is drawn to the advancing tide of Mahone’s men in the Twelfth Virginia Infantry, who are poised to sweep the area and put an end to any planned Union advance. One art critic left a colorful review: “The suspense in this portion of the scene is fearful; and one dreads that the reinforcements will arrive to[o] late. But they are hurrying on. With their wild, impulsive yell, so characteristic of the Southern army, regardless of rank or line, in double column, Mahone’s brigade comes pouring in.” The success of Elder’s painting helped to shape the popular belief that Confederate victory could be understood by focusing on the contributions of Virginians.

A review of the book’s introduction and first chapter can be read here.

IMAGE: Postcard from 1930 based on the Elder painting

letuscrossovertheriver:

July 18th, 1863 - The Second Battle of Fort Wagner

letuscrossovertheriver:

July 18th, 1863 - The Second Battle of Fort Wagner


 


 

(Source: civilwar6165)

Stone Mountain Park  (Stone Mountain ,Georgia)

A craving of three Confederate heroes: Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, and Stonewall Jackson

(Source: vamphorrorstory)